A great read

Chat about anything in here

Moderators: Philip Whiteman, George, Dave Cox

User avatar
John Sanderson
Posts: 114
Joined: 27 Nov 2006 21:35
Real Name:
Location: Colchester, Essex

Post by John Sanderson » 18 Nov 2011 10:03

John, if you are going to plug your own work, it's no good being half-hearted about it.
...On the 'to-do' list is a post about humility and self-depreciation and their place in cycling. It is one of the elements of the sport that appeals to me the most.... :D
It's all about the bike.

User avatar
Andy Terry
Posts: 836
Joined: 20 Nov 2006 14:27
Real Name:
Location: Bromsgrove, Worcs

Post by Andy Terry » 07 Jan 2012 16:47

I was given "Mountain High: Europe's 50 Greatest Cycle Climbs" by Daniel Friebe and Chris Goding for Christmas. Great photos, interesting narrative, plus maps, profiles and stats. Ideal armchair reading for the winter months. A big hardcover book and a snip at £10 on Amazon.

User avatar
Andy Terry
Posts: 836
Joined: 20 Nov 2006 14:27
Real Name:
Location: Bromsgrove, Worcs

Post by Andy Terry » 07 Jan 2012 16:53

John Sanderson wrote:I wouldn't make the claim that it was a great read - but something that requires readers nonetheless is... - the blog i've started http://meandthemountain.wordpress.com/ which is, in a roundabout way, Beacon related. I hope you can forgive my comment about the "90's" kit...
I like the bit about waking up feeling rough on Boxing Day and squirting GT85 on the moving parts to stop them squeaking.

User avatar
John Sanderson
Posts: 114
Joined: 27 Nov 2006 21:35
Real Name:
Location: Colchester, Essex

Post by John Sanderson » 25 Jan 2012 10:38

Another interesting read:
http://www.amazon.co.uk/Bounce-How-Cham ... 830&sr=8-2

Glad you enjoyed the blog Terry - i've just added another post - my i continue to be forgiven for poking fun at the 2005 Beacon kit design (which in my defence I wear proudly (matching shorts/short-long-and winter jersey and even mitts) around the roads of Essex with regularity)...
It's all about the bike.

laurence_cooley
Posts: 936
Joined: 31 Dec 2011 13:48
Real Name:
Location: Harborne

Post by laurence_cooley » 14 Feb 2012 09:43

Slightly off-topic as it's a film rather than a book, but A Sunday in Hell in on YouTube and is well worth watching if you haven't seen it: http://youtu.be/D4IDCkcnnHg

Martin Sketchley
Posts: 19
Joined: 03 Sep 2011 16:24
Real Name:
Location: Bournville
Contact:

Post by Martin Sketchley » 14 Feb 2012 10:04

I bought the Mark Cavendish autobiography on Kindle last week. It's incredible dull, written in a distinctly dreary monotone voice. But I suppose that's how he speaks, right?

And within pages the term "light year" was used as a measure of time. I can forgive MC for that, but someone down the chain – editor, copy-editor, proofreader – should have picked it up. Doesn't exactly inspire confidence for the rest of it.

User avatar
Andy Terry
Posts: 836
Joined: 20 Nov 2006 14:27
Real Name:
Location: Bromsgrove, Worcs

Post by Andy Terry » 14 Feb 2012 10:37

Martin Sketchley wrote:I bought the Mark Cavendish autobiography on Kindle last week. It's incredible dull, written in a distinctly dreary monotone voice. But I suppose that's how he speaks, right?

And within pages the term "light year" was used as a measure of time. I can forgive MC for that, but someone down the chain – editor, copy-editor, proofreader – should have picked it up. Doesn't exactly inspire confidence for the rest of it.
Ghost-written by Daniel Friebe. Author of 'Mountain High' - see above.

User avatar
John Sanderson
Posts: 114
Joined: 27 Nov 2006 21:35
Real Name:
Location: Colchester, Essex

Post by John Sanderson » 14 Feb 2012 12:23

lc1981 wrote:Slightly off-topic as it's a film rather than a book, but A Sunday in Hell in on YouTube and is well worth watching if you haven't seen it: http://youtu.be/D4IDCkcnnHg
A bit odd to watch in the context of the TV coverage we get nowadays.. But good nonetheless.
It's all about the bike.

bobg
Posts: 94
Joined: 10 May 2010 14:47
Real Name: Bob Green

Tour de France

Post by bobg » 23 May 2012 09:26

Just got a book from The Works on the history of the T.D.F. It's quite a large book with some great photographs. Dont think it could happen today but has a pic of the peleton stopping to cool down in the sea (1950) and another smoking a ciggie (1929). All in all a good buy at £6-99

User avatar
Ed Moss
Posts: 444
Joined: 19 Nov 2006 23:51
Real Name: Ed Moss
Contact:

Post by Ed Moss » 23 May 2012 09:40

I've just pre ordered the new book about Stephen Roche, hope it's as good as the Fignon book.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sQojh-wqL04

You can never watch this too many times :D

Missiles
Posts: 164
Joined: 19 Nov 2006 13:29
Real Name:
Contact:

Post by Missiles » 23 May 2012 11:26

Ed Moss wrote:I've just pre ordered the new book about Stephen Roche, hope it's as good as the Fignon book.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sQojh-wqL04

You can never watch this too many times :D
Doesn't it seem odd now, having to reach to your downtube to change gear......

User avatar
George
Posts: 1621
Joined: 18 Nov 2006 10:21
Real Name: George Barker
Location: Worcestershire

Post by George » 24 May 2012 10:29

I am in the process of reading Three Men on the Bummel.

Don't jump to any outrageous conclusions: it's the sequel to Three Men in a Boat, which I didn't realise existed until it was given to me as a Christmas present. And it's about cycling ... in a vague sort of way. The same trio that went off in the boat decide to cycle through the Black Forest.

Inevitably with a book that was written well over 100 years ago, the modern reader has to do a little bit of adjusting to the writing style ... but only a little; it's not a dense book at all. It's wonderfully observed and full of gentle, understated English humour. And, given that it's set in an era when our pastime was in its infancy, everything is remarkably similar. There is even an anecdote about a man and his wife on a tandem ride, which is uncannily similar to a much more recent presidential incident.

Highly recommended.

Les Ladbury
Posts: 99
Joined: 29 Nov 2006 17:52
Real Name:

Re: Tour de France

Post by Les Ladbury » 19 Jun 2012 07:26

bobg wrote:Just got a book from The Works on the history of the T.D.F. It's quite a large book with some great photographs. Dont think it could happen today but has a pic of the peleton stopping to cool down in the sea (1950) and another smoking a ciggie (1929). All in all a good buy at £6-99
I saw this yesterday in Bromsgrove. Very tempted to buy together with any book about the TdeF at a similar price. However having just completed collecting a whole series, 45 books in all, published in France by l'Equipe on the complete history of the Tour I thought that I should give it a miss.

If anyone is looking for such a book get yourself down to Bromsgrove PDQ.
Les

User avatar
Ed Moss
Posts: 444
Joined: 19 Nov 2006 23:51
Real Name: Ed Moss
Contact:

Post by Ed Moss » 31 Aug 2012 08:36

Just read Stepehn Roche's new book.
Lots of opinion later on in the book which is interesting to read, Cancellara slowing down the TDF to let Schleck catch up a few years ago, race radio, jerseys..

Much of it was about what could have been after 1987 had he not sustained his knee injury.

Book was loads better than the books he released in the 80's.

Next on the list, Tyler Hamilton's new book

http://www.cyclingnews.com/news/hamilto ... -de-france

User avatar
Ed Moss
Posts: 444
Joined: 19 Nov 2006 23:51
Real Name: Ed Moss
Contact:

Post by Ed Moss » 23 Sep 2012 14:43

About half way through, it's all truth or one of the greatest works of fiction ever, bit like Lance then :wink:

http://www.cyclingnews.com/news/hamilto ... -the-truth

User avatar
George
Posts: 1621
Joined: 18 Nov 2006 10:21
Real Name: George Barker
Location: Worcestershire

Post by George » 23 Sep 2012 16:18

I'm no more fond of Hamilton than of Armstrong. I never found him a very likeable character even before the S hit the F, and riders who dope when it's in their own direct financial interest, then say it's all wrong when that's in their own direct financial interest don't have very much moral credibility in my eyes. So I'm troubled by the idea of contributing to his income. Nevertheless, I would be interested to hear what he's got to say. Can't therefore decide whether to buy the book or not.

Jane Herrin
Posts: 55
Joined: 30 Nov 2006 14:41
Real Name:

Post by Jane Herrin » 23 Sep 2012 16:59

Perhaps we should buy one club owned copy and pass it round, thus gaining the information with minimal gain to the Hamilton coffers.

User avatar
Ed Moss
Posts: 444
Joined: 19 Nov 2006 23:51
Real Name: Ed Moss
Contact:

Post by Ed Moss » 26 Sep 2012 18:37

Finished it a couple of nights ago, feel a bit sorry for Hamilton, it was a case of dope or go home.
He alludes that testicular cancer can be caused by steroid use, something I was also told by cyclist in the US as few years ago.

I'm surprised any of them are still alive, non of them knew how their blood bags were been stored, on one occasion Hamiltons pee turned thick red with dead red blood cells, he thinks he was given the wrong blood.

Tyler comes across as someone who has made his peace with cycling and is slightly ashamed what he did, but at the time, in his world it was normal.

Simon Dighton
Posts: 431
Joined: 21 Nov 2006 16:10
Real Name:

Post by Simon Dighton » 26 Sep 2012 21:14

Charlie
Would love a copy of Tommy Godwin's book as a present for a friend who used to know him. Would you be good enough to put a copy to one side and let me know when best to give you some money and collect if still some copies available.
Best
Simon

laurence_cooley
Posts: 936
Joined: 31 Dec 2011 13:48
Real Name:
Location: Harborne

Post by laurence_cooley » 10 Nov 2012 11:08

This sounds like it might be worth a look: http://www.lionelbirnie.com/cyclinganthology/.

User avatar
John Sanderson
Posts: 114
Joined: 27 Nov 2006 21:35
Real Name:
Location: Colchester, Essex

Post by John Sanderson » 20 Nov 2012 09:06

George wrote:I am in the process of reading Three Men on the Bummel.

Don't jump to any outrageous conclusions: it's the sequel to Three Men in a Boat, which I didn't realise existed until it was given to me as a Christmas present. And it's about cycling ... in a vague sort of way. The same trio that went off in the boat decide to cycle through the Black Forest.

Inevitably with a book that was written well over 100 years ago, the modern reader has to do a little bit of adjusting to the writing style ... but only a little; it's not a dense book at all. It's wonderfully observed and full of gentle, understated English humour. And, given that it's set in an era when our pastime was in its infancy, everything is remarkably similar. There is even an anecdote about a man and his wife on a tandem ride, which is uncannily similar to a much more recent presidential incident.

Highly recommended.
Assuming you finished it George, would you still say 'highly recommended'? I though the book started very well but sort of faded away in the middle to a fairly weak end. Although it was a long time ago that I read it I recall Three Men In A Boat being a cracking read from start to finish, so I was a bit disappointed by the 'sequel'...
It's all about the bike.

User avatar
George
Posts: 1621
Joined: 18 Nov 2006 10:21
Real Name: George Barker
Location: Worcestershire

Post by George » 20 Nov 2012 10:35

Yes, John, I take your point. It started out very well but, by the end, it seemed to have lost its sense of direction. That's not to say that I didn't enjoy it, but that my enthusiasm waned along the way. I would downgrade my rating from "highly recommended" to "recommended".

User avatar
snailmale
Posts: 108
Joined: 22 Nov 2006 10:03
Real Name: Alan Nicholls
Location: Worcester

Post by snailmale » 20 Nov 2012 10:41

George wrote:Yes, John, I take your point. It started out very well but, by the end, it seemed to have lost its sense of direction.
Should have used a Garmin
It is better to be interesting rather than exact

User avatar
Philip Whiteman
Posts: 1679
Joined: 19 Nov 2006 16:17
Real Name:
Location: Drayton, Worcestershire

Post by Philip Whiteman » 01 Dec 2012 12:27

Cut and pasted from another thread:
bobg wrote:Just reading One man and his bike by Mike Carter. Mike was a journalist who cycled to work in London, and every day got to the north side of Blackfriars bridge and turned left. He then thought, if one day i turned right and just kept going, eventualy would arrive back on the south side of the Thames and home. A well written amusing cycling / travel book
Beacon Audaxes The Kidderminster Killer & From Clee to Heaven 20.7.19; Autumn South Salopian 5.10.19. www.beaconrcc.org.uk/

User avatar
Philip Whiteman
Posts: 1679
Joined: 19 Nov 2006 16:17
Real Name:
Location: Drayton, Worcestershire

Post by Philip Whiteman » 04 Jan 2013 15:47

The Secret Race. Tyler Hamilton & Daniel Coyle. 2012. MP3.
Racing Through the Dark. David Millar. 2011.

Ostensibly on the packaging of these two publications would suggest two riders with similar experiences of professional racing; reluctant professionals driven to doping, exposed to a corrupt system, personal loss and devastation, followed by a willingness to expose appalling practices within the sport, both providing a sense that cycling has lost its way and far from their idealised dreams of youth.

However, read together they provide a very different flavour. Millar’s book is almost timid and inconsequential in comparison. Tyler and Coyle’s exposé is shocking through its head on attack of out and out corruption of Armstrong, the medical profession and the UCI’s complicity. Tyler and Coyle, unlike Millar, ring out every little last sawded detail on how riders cheated. Their detail is far more extensive that Millar’s own publication. With the latter, I gain the impression that either he was not fully aware of the extent of doping or he held back choosing not to blow the lid of the can.

Millar’s publication was an enjoyable read and interesting insight on what happens to a convicted doper whose dreams have been destroyed. His story is personal and insightful. During his years in exile he suffered bankruptcy and alcoholism – a big fall from his previous existence and penchant for the fast car life style. The book has a good beginning and middle but it was one of the publications that failed to conclude well giving an impression that he or his shadow author had run out of steam.

Tyler and Coyle exceeds Millar’s league in terms of enjoyability. Lisa and I listened to the unabridged audio version for three hours every night over Christmas week. During the day, we would hold lengthy discussions, utter agog at what we had heard the night before. Unlike Millar and some other cyclist’s biographies, there is no bitterness from Hamilton. Just a desire to get some very dark secrets off his chest - something he does so with complete clarity and apparent lack of agenda. He doesn't even claim to feel a huge amount of guilt, except perhaps for deceiving his parents.

If you are someone who does not like cycling’s disreputable past to be exposed leaving a foul taste in your mouth, then don’t read Tyler. Equally, if you intend to read both then I suggest starting with Millar. Leave it the other way around and you will be bitterly disappointed.

In short I no longer have any romantic thoughts regarding the world of professional cycle racing.
Beacon Audaxes The Kidderminster Killer & From Clee to Heaven 20.7.19; Autumn South Salopian 5.10.19. www.beaconrcc.org.uk/

Tim
Posts: 1229
Joined: 06 Sep 2011 17:02
Real Name: Tim Egan
Location: Bournville

Post by Tim » 04 Jan 2013 16:08

I'm part way through Secret Race and also finding it to be a great read. For me a must read if you are a fan of professional cycling and have watched it over the last 20years.

Think this may be the last one I read though from the doping genre, after in the past reading Rough Ride by Paul Kimmage (best book ive read, read it if you haven't) and The Death of Marco Pantani (good but very science based and bit depressing as you know the ending!).
I think I might have had enough of it.

Yes the romance is tarnished but I wouldnt say gone completely, even with what we now know there's still something romantic about the professional races and now it does seem to be genuinely cleaner so there's hope for the future.

I don't know whether to read Millar's. As I said I may have had my fill of drugs and confessions and Ive always found it to be a bit annoying his "former doper now anti-doping activist" stance. If he hadnt have been caught he would still be on EPO and he certainly has been measured in the scope of his confessions.

laurence_cooley
Posts: 936
Joined: 31 Dec 2011 13:48
Real Name:
Location: Harborne

Post by laurence_cooley » 04 Feb 2013 21:46

laurence_cooley wrote:Slightly off-topic as it's a film rather than a book, but A Sunday in Hell in on YouTube and is well worth watching if you haven't seen it: http://youtu.be/D4IDCkcnnHg
And if you liked that then Stars and Watercarriers, which follows the 1973 Giro and is by the same director, is also on YouTube: http://youtu.be/vQ0pUiTXV40.

User avatar
Si_Walker
Posts: 216
Joined: 28 Mar 2012 18:58
Real Name:
Location: Harborne

Post by Si_Walker » 24 Mar 2013 21:03

laurence_cooley wrote:
laurence_cooley wrote:Slightly off-topic as it's a film rather than a book, but A Sunday in Hell in on YouTube and is well worth watching if you haven't seen it: http://youtu.be/D4IDCkcnnHg
And if you liked that then Stars and Watercarriers, which follows the 1973 Giro and is by the same director, is also on YouTube: http://youtu.be/vQ0pUiTXV40.
I watched this vid this afternoon and really enjoyed it, then I Watched another vid about a guy who had a bike built at Rourke's, which was quite entertaining and interesting, although it was in 4 parts it was worth the watch.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1p6xSIbvcUo
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r5B0HL5WLMs
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=11YxHZ4NuCw
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xhv8pEGazEA

Kev C
Posts: 30
Joined: 06 Mar 2013 09:36
Real Name:
Location: Halesowen

Post by Kev C » 13 Apr 2013 20:53

Just read an excellent book called: Paris-Roubaix, The Inside Story: All the Bumps of Cycling's Cobbled Classic by Les Woodland . It's a must for any fan of Paris Roubaix. Below is a link for the trailer of the book

http://youtu.be/umtefgwRlL0

Kev C
Posts: 30
Joined: 06 Mar 2013 09:36
Real Name:
Location: Halesowen

Post by Kev C » 02 Aug 2013 21:21

Just finished reading "Reg Harris: The rise and fall of Britain's greatest cyclist" by Robert Dineen. An interesting book about an interesting champion and a nice easy read. I'm not sure nowadays whether he is “Britain’s Greatest Cyclist” when you consider the achievements of Tommy Godwin, Tom Simpson, Chris Hoy, Mark Cavendish, Bradley Wiggins Chris Froome etc but he was a great champion of his era.
When my legs hurt, I say: "Shut up legs! Do what I tell you to do!" ~ Jens Voigt

Les Ladbury
Posts: 99
Joined: 29 Nov 2006 17:52
Real Name:

Post by Les Ladbury » 03 Oct 2013 12:09

Kev C wrote:Just finished reading "Reg Harris: The rise and fall of Britain's greatest cyclist" by Robert Dineen. An interesting book about an interesting champion and a nice easy read. I'm not sure nowadays whether he is “Britain’s Greatest Cyclist” when you consider the achievements of Tommy Godwin, Tom Simpson, Chris Hoy, Mark Cavendish, Bradley Wiggins Chris Froome etc but he was a great champion of his era.
Was Harris the greatest rider ever? That’s an unanswerable question. What is true is that Harris possessed a huge charisma which, with one or two notable exceptions is lacking in the present generation of top riders. Whether you liked him or loathed him one thing that you couldn’t do is ignore him.
I know that Tom Godwin couldn’t stand the man, in fact I well recall Tom telling me that he, Tom, had been in invited to attend a Manchester Wheeler dinner and would only go if Harris wasn’t there.
In the book was anything said about the time Harris “won” the National Sprint Championship? I would by very interested to know as would those who know the true story.
In those days sprinting was the tops as far as track racing was concerned and the likes of Harris, Arie van Vliet, Antonio Maspes and so on were the superstars of their day. They didn’t prat about with kierin (sp) team sprints and other Mickey Mouse events.
Les

User avatar
George
Posts: 1621
Joined: 18 Nov 2006 10:21
Real Name: George Barker
Location: Worcestershire

Post by George » 04 Oct 2013 08:55

Les Ladbury wrote: ... those who know the true story ...
Come on, Les. Stop teasing us.

Les Ladbury
Posts: 99
Joined: 29 Nov 2006 17:52
Real Name:

Post by Les Ladbury » 05 Oct 2013 15:24

George wrote:
Les Ladbury wrote: ... those who know the true story ...
Come on, Les. Stop teasing us.
George,

There is a story behind this but in view of the fact that I don't want "Lawyers R Us" knocking on my front door I couldn't possibly comment.
Les

User avatar
George
Posts: 1621
Joined: 18 Nov 2006 10:21
Real Name: George Barker
Location: Worcestershire

Post by George » 05 Oct 2013 17:55

Les Ladbury wrote:There is a story behind this but in view of the fact that I don't want "Lawyers R Us" knocking on my front door I couldn't possibly comment.
You drive a hard bargain, Les. I'll buy you half a mild at the Dinner.

Les Ladbury
Posts: 99
Joined: 29 Nov 2006 17:52
Real Name:

Post by Les Ladbury » 05 Oct 2013 19:07

George wrote:
Les Ladbury wrote:There is a story behind this but in view of the fact that I don't want "Lawyers R Us" knocking on my front door I couldn't possibly comment.
You drive a hard bargain, Les. I'll buy you half a mild at the Dinner.
Noted George.
Les

andrew clayton
Posts: 111
Joined: 14 Apr 2013 21:41
Real Name:

Post by andrew clayton » 04 Nov 2013 20:16

Just finished reading French Revolutions, pleasant and amusing. If anyone fancies it or wants to swap for another read then let me know.

slogfester
Posts: 390
Joined: 10 Oct 2009 13:12
Real Name: Barry Evans
Location: Birmingham

Gironimo- Tim Moore's new book

Post by slogfester » 20 May 2014 10:30

Tim Moore has published another funny ditty on his re-enactment of the infamous 1914 Giro d'Italia; average stage length over 400 km! It was the BBC R4 Book the of the week, narrated by Tim himself.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b04442bq
Unfortunately the first episode has gone but 2-5 are still available on iPlayer.

Makes you realise what a bunch of lite weights, the current bunch of light weights are.

Barry (who tours Europe on a titanium Rolls Royce while sipping macchiatos 8) )
Belt up, we're going for a ride

Les Ladbury
Posts: 99
Joined: 29 Nov 2006 17:52
Real Name:

24 Months in the Saddle

Post by Les Ladbury » 29 Sep 2014 07:49

I've just bought "24 Months in the Saddle" and can recommend it to anyone interested in cycling. It isn't great literature but if you want that stick to Proust or Does, Doust, Dostaevski......Can't spell but you know that Russian geezer.

If you can tolerate mangling of the English language so prevalent today it's a pleasant read with some rather good photographs.

Buy it, steal it or borrow it and I don't think that you will be disappointed.

Also remember Christmas is just around the corner, know what I mean, nudge, nudge, wink, wink.
Les

Dave Cox
Posts: 643
Joined: 23 Jan 2007 18:03
Real Name:

Post by Dave Cox » 29 Sep 2014 22:49

Carlton Reid Roads Weren't Built for Cars has just come out - I read and commented on the beta version It is a fascinating account of the early cycling boom 1870 - 1914 and the influence of lobbyists like the CTC and League of American Wheelmen on the development of the modern road network - all pre car. Then there was a mass migration of manufacturers, enthusiasts, influential policy makers, racers etc from bikes to cars. By the 1920s cars were for the rich, cycles were relegated to proletarian transport and motoring's debt to the bike was systematically blanked out of historical accounts.

Interesting basis for today's debates and allocation of road space arguments

User avatar
Si_Walker
Posts: 216
Joined: 28 Mar 2012 18:58
Real Name:
Location: Harborne

Re: A great read

Post by Si_Walker » 09 May 2019 21:37

Some interesting short reads and vids on cycling from the Boneshaker mag

https://boneshakermag.com/features/

and a few podcasts here.
https://boneshakermag.com/podcasts/epis ... sign-life/

and here
https://boneshakermag.com/blog/
Si Walker
Beacon Roads Cycling Club

Post Reply

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 4 guests