A great read

Chat about anything in here

Moderators: Philip Whiteman, George, Dave Cox

Lisa
Posts: 18
Joined: 19 Nov 2006 16:51
Real Name:
Location: Drayton, Worcestershire

A great read

Post by Lisa » 17 May 2007 17:29

I recommend a book called 'French Revolutions - cycling the Tour de France' by journalist Tim Moore. He decided to ride the whole of the Tour's 2000 route before the race itself started, despite not having ever ridden seriously before. It's absolutely hilarious. :lol:

User avatar
George
Posts: 1644
Joined: 18 Nov 2006 10:21
Real Name: George Barker
Location: Worcestershire

Post by George » 17 May 2007 21:14

Yes, I read that too and loved it. Started off thinking 'Who is this twat?' but was quickly won over. Anchovy pizza, budgies on a perch and excuses for not climbing (?)the Aubisque will not be forgotten quickly.

Lisa
Posts: 18
Joined: 19 Nov 2006 16:51
Real Name:
Location: Drayton, Worcestershire

Post by Lisa » 20 May 2007 13:38

Finished and ready to lend out, if anyone fancies it. Great tips on cheating and drug-taking... :shock:
Why?

User avatar
Philip Whiteman
Posts: 1712
Joined: 19 Nov 2006 16:17
Real Name:
Location: Drayton, Worcestershire

Post by Philip Whiteman » 20 May 2007 20:38

I have to read it first!
Beacon Audaxes The Kidderminster Killer & From Clee to Heaven 20.7.19; Autumn South Salopian 5.10.19. www.beaconrcc.org.uk/

Lisa
Posts: 18
Joined: 19 Nov 2006 16:51
Real Name:
Location: Drayton, Worcestershire

Post by Lisa » 21 May 2007 14:09

oh yes - sorry! :wink:
Why?

kingrollo
Posts: 1
Joined: 03 Dec 2006 20:10
Real Name:
Location: Halesowen

Post by kingrollo » 11 Jun 2007 19:03

The Escape Artist - Matt Seatton - Great Read

All the lance books

The Flying Scotsman - a real gritty tale - Good

The Death of Marco Pantini - Terrible Book - unless you like reading blood test results in no particular order.

User avatar
Ed Moss
Posts: 444
Joined: 19 Nov 2006 23:51
Real Name: Ed Moss
Contact:

Post by Ed Moss » 11 Jun 2007 19:09

kingrollo wrote:The Escape Artist - Matt Seatton - Great Read

All the lance books

The Flying Scotsman - a real gritty tale - Good

The Death of Marco Pantini - Terrible Book - unless you like reading blood test results in no particular order.
Sorry can't agree with the 2nd LA book, it should of been titled "I'm Lance and have I told you how great I am, No? Then here's 200+ pages just to remind you I'm Lance Armstrong and I'm great"

User avatar
Philip Whiteman
Posts: 1712
Joined: 19 Nov 2006 16:17
Real Name:
Location: Drayton, Worcestershire

Post by Philip Whiteman » 11 Jun 2007 19:32

Ed Moss wrote:
Sorry can't agree with the 2nd LA book, it should of been titled "I'm Lance and have I told you how great I am, No? Then here's 200+ pages just to remind you I'm Lance Armstrong and I'm great"

Hmmm, yes. Of course the 2nd is a sequal to his first book, "I am Lance Armstrong, I am actually quite important you know but I will only infere it".

I have not read his second book due to the critiques. Whilst his first publication is readable and interesting, I still gained an impression that it was not just an account of awful period with illness but also one of an inflated ego.
Beacon Audaxes The Kidderminster Killer & From Clee to Heaven 20.7.19; Autumn South Salopian 5.10.19. www.beaconrcc.org.uk/

User avatar
George
Posts: 1644
Joined: 18 Nov 2006 10:21
Real Name: George Barker
Location: Worcestershire

Post by George » 12 Jun 2007 10:00

I only read the first LA book, which I found fascinating and nauseating in equal measure. You can't help but marvel at his determination and dedication, but it's equally hard to resist casting the book aside with angry declamations of American arrogance when you read passages such as that recounting some advice he was given in his early days by (I paraphrase from memory) "Eddy Merckx, a former champion cyclist". Of course, it's hard to know how much that sort of thing reflects LA's attitudes, his Ghost writer's ignorance, or the publisher's assumptions regarding the ignorance of the reader.

User avatar
Ed Moss
Posts: 444
Joined: 19 Nov 2006 23:51
Real Name: Ed Moss
Contact:

Post by Ed Moss » 12 Jun 2007 11:10

I think it had a lot to do with the ghost writer and a strong hint of LA arrogance as well. There is a great interview with Greg Lemond in the current issue of Rouleur, he describes LA as "I just think he's not a good person and that's all I can say"
Sounds like they had an interesting time when Trek took over Lemond bikes.....

User avatar
Between Peaks
Posts: 71
Joined: 20 Nov 2006 16:41
Real Name:
Location: Bournville

Post by Between Peaks » 12 Jun 2007 11:17

hmm the problem is . . . . Lemond has more than a few chips on his shoulder too . . most TdF winners have more than a touch of arrogance about them . . . that said neither Indurain or Ullrich ever come across as arrogant - so maybe it is an american thing :)

User avatar
Ed Moss
Posts: 444
Joined: 19 Nov 2006 23:51
Real Name: Ed Moss
Contact:

Post by Ed Moss » 12 Jun 2007 11:34

Without taking this off topic too much they ask him about his bitterness, he says what has he got to be bitter about? With 3 tdf wins, 2x world championships and a handful of other top placings in his accolades.
The interview goes on to say eventually Lance will have no friends left in cycling....we will never know.....

Dave Cox
Posts: 650
Joined: 23 Jan 2007 18:03
Real Name:

Books

Post by Dave Cox » 12 Jun 2007 12:09

Has anyone else read Tim Krabbe 's The Rider ? Recommended by Matt Seaton on BBC bookclub. Captures I think the essence of road racing. Just read it on holiday trip. Happy to lend.

User avatar
Philip Whiteman
Posts: 1712
Joined: 19 Nov 2006 16:17
Real Name:
Location: Drayton, Worcestershire

Post by Philip Whiteman » 12 Jun 2007 12:50

Dave, I started to read Krabbe but found it rather difficult to engage with his rather turgid and descriptive style of writing unlike Seaton's own publication. I managed around three chapters before returning it to the shelf. I was probably in a terrible mood at the time as I have heard plenty of raving reviews from elsewhere.

Has anybody read Chris Smith's book about his ride to Beijing?
Beacon Audaxes The Kidderminster Killer & From Clee to Heaven 20.7.19; Autumn South Salopian 5.10.19. www.beaconrcc.org.uk/

User avatar
Between Peaks
Posts: 71
Joined: 20 Nov 2006 16:41
Real Name:
Location: Bournville

Post by Between Peaks » 12 Jun 2007 13:06

'The Rider' is one of my all time favourite books.

User avatar
George
Posts: 1644
Joined: 18 Nov 2006 10:21
Real Name: George Barker
Location: Worcestershire

Post by George » 12 Jun 2007 19:53

Philip Whiteman wrote:rather turgid and descriptive style of writing
Sound right up my street.

Dave Cox
Posts: 650
Joined: 23 Jan 2007 18:03
Real Name:

Post by Dave Cox » 12 Jun 2007 21:30

Yes I read Chris Smith's book straight after his talk and really got into his quirky take on long distance cycling. I am now reading Alistair Humphries Mood of Future Joys about a ride down Africa - not as good but another example of internet publishing. I've also read some time ago Mark Jenkins Off the Map about a mad expedition across Russia which I like because he starts off from how his first bike liberated him to explore round the corner of his home street.

User avatar
Philip Whiteman
Posts: 1712
Joined: 19 Nov 2006 16:17
Real Name:
Location: Drayton, Worcestershire

Post by Philip Whiteman » 12 Jun 2007 21:33

Dave Cox wrote:Yes I read Chris Smith's book straight after his talk and really got into his quirky take on long distance cycling. I am now reading Alistair Humphries Mood of Future Joys about a ride down Africa - not as good but another example of internet publishing. I've also read some time ago Mark Jenkins Off the Map about a mad expedition across Russia which I like because he starts off from how his first bike liberated him to explore round the corner of his home street.
Both sound quite interesting. I will keep an eye open for them.
Beacon Audaxes The Kidderminster Killer & From Clee to Heaven 20.7.19; Autumn South Salopian 5.10.19. www.beaconrcc.org.uk/

charlie
Posts: 36
Joined: 02 Dec 2006 20:46
Real Name:
Location: Kings Heath

Post by charlie » 13 Jun 2007 17:57

:roll: Tommy Godwin called round today and left me a few copies of the book that he has written, entitled ;; "IT WASN'T THAT EASY" They will retail at £15. A quick browse through at the pictures leaves me thinking it should be a good, humerous read. Anyone interested in a copy?

User avatar
CakeStop
Posts: 1211
Joined: 17 Nov 2006 21:57
Real Name: Steve Smith
Location: Birmingham

Post by CakeStop » 29 Jun 2007 11:22

charlie wrote::roll: Tommy Godwin called round today and left me a few copies of the book that he has written, entitled ;; "IT WASN'T THAT EASY" They will retail at £15. A quick browse through at the pictures leaves me thinking it should be a good, humerous read. Anyone interested in a copy?
I picked up a copy of this book last night with the intention that it should provide some summer holiday reading. I haven't read it yet therefore but thought I'd give it a mention now as there are only a limited number of copies available from the initial print run.

All proceeds go to the John Pinkerton Memorial Publishing Fund.

It looks like it'll provide a pleasant read. Well illustrated with photo's from Tommy Godwin's personal collection, it describes not just his own life but provides an interesting history of British cycling through the 1940's to the 1960's. I'm looking forward to reading it, maybe I'll be able to resist the temptation until the holiday.

charlie
Posts: 36
Joined: 02 Dec 2006 20:46
Real Name:
Location: Kings Heath

Post by charlie » 30 Jun 2007 12:27

:roll: I have still got 4 copies of Toms book left if anyone is interested? Will have them with me at the open 10. Charlie.

User avatar
CakeStop
Posts: 1211
Joined: 17 Nov 2006 21:57
Real Name: Steve Smith
Location: Birmingham

Post by CakeStop » 04 Oct 2007 20:13

Philip Whiteman wrote:I started to read Krabbe but found it rather difficult to engage with his rather turgid and descriptive style of writing unlike Seaton's own publication. I managed around three chapters before returning it to the shelf. I was probably in a terrible mood at the time as I have heard plenty of raving reviews from elsewhere.
I'm reading this book at the moment but I'm wondering if it's the same book that Phil part read because not only am I enjoying the style of writing but the book only has one chapter (containing 137km) :?

User avatar
Philip Whiteman
Posts: 1712
Joined: 19 Nov 2006 16:17
Real Name:
Location: Drayton, Worcestershire

Post by Philip Whiteman » 05 Oct 2007 08:49

CakeStop wrote:
Philip Whiteman wrote:I started to read Krabbe but found it rather difficult to engage with his rather turgid and descriptive style of writing unlike Seaton's own publication. I managed around three chapters before returning it to the shelf. I was probably in a terrible mood at the time as I have heard plenty of raving reviews from elsewhere.
I'm reading this book at the moment but I'm wondering if it's the same book that Phil part read because not only am I enjoying the style of writing but the book only has one chapter (containing 137km) :?
May revisit this book at some stage in that case. It was quite some time ago since I looked at it. Plenty of other books to read in the mean time though, including Chris Smith's 'Bewdley to Beijing'.
Beacon Audaxes The Kidderminster Killer & From Clee to Heaven 20.7.19; Autumn South Salopian 5.10.19. www.beaconrcc.org.uk/

User avatar
George
Posts: 1644
Joined: 18 Nov 2006 10:21
Real Name: George Barker
Location: Worcestershire

Post by George » 05 Oct 2007 13:45

Krabbe did 137km!?! That's a heck of a long way to go sideways.

pprince3145
Posts: 23
Joined: 21 Nov 2006 00:00
Real Name:
Location: Earlswood, Solihull
Contact:

Post by pprince3145 » 06 Oct 2007 09:02

put me back on my bike - brilliant! best biog (Tom Simpson) I've ever read
the flying scotsman - dark
le tour, a history of the tdf - very hard going but some amazing facts
LA's books - inspiring but he has always been brash which was born out of his father leaving I think
Mike Hutchinsons hour attempt - quirky and very funny in parts
Cult Racing...better than Rock Racing
www.cultracing.com

User avatar
Ed Moss
Posts: 444
Joined: 19 Nov 2006 23:51
Real Name: Ed Moss
Contact:

Post by Ed Moss » 27 Dec 2007 08:55

This months Pro Cycling is worth a look at, 70 odd pages of Greg Lemond. He has some really interesting comments on training (no 7 hour rides in winter) and the current cycling scene.

User avatar
CakeStop
Posts: 1211
Joined: 17 Nov 2006 21:57
Real Name: Steve Smith
Location: Birmingham

One More Kilometre and We're in the Showers

Post by CakeStop » 31 Mar 2008 12:05

One More Kilometre and We're in the Showers - Memoirs of a Cyclist
by Tim Hilton


A sort of history of cycling covering most of the 20th century but focussing on 1930-1970. Includes accounts of key amateur (British) and professional racers. A good balance between professional and club cycling. As a child the author lived on the Bristol Road so there are many references to local clubs but sadly not the Beacon. Being written from a fairly personal perspective it's slightly quirky at times but overall I found it an easy and enjoyable read.

User avatar
CakeStop
Posts: 1211
Joined: 17 Nov 2006 21:57
Real Name: Steve Smith
Location: Birmingham

Roule Britannia

Post by CakeStop » 20 Aug 2008 17:22

Roule Britannia - William Fotheringham

A history of Britons in the Tour de France (up to 2004)

A chapter on each of the key figures. Each chapter refers to all of the subjects contemporaries and as each ones career may overlap a number of chapters the exact chronology is tricky to follow. Based partly on interviews with those involved at the time it includes some interesting personal insights. Good coverage of some of the more reclusive characters I've not seen covered in detail elsewhere eg Robert Millar.

Worth a read.

Mattoid
Posts: 40
Joined: 10 Oct 2007 16:52
Real Name: Philip Griffiths

Post by Mattoid » 26 Aug 2008 19:19

Some residents of my bookshelf....

Put Me Back On My Bike - In Search of Tom Simpson
William Fotheringham
Probably goes without saying that this is an essential read, if not only about the man himself, but to be educated about the history of drugs in cycling.

In Search of Robert Millar
Richard Moore
This was read in a couple of sittings, again an essential read about another of the UK's most successful cyclist, if not THE most successful. He was my cycling hero, so was pleased to find this a great read - recommended!!

Long Cloud Ride
Josie Dew
Another one in the series of books by Josie recording her worldly travels by velo. This time around New Zealand. For me, this was a good read as it brought back many memories of travelling around this wonderful country nearly 10 years ago now. If you can get past the repeated fact that most kiwis are nutters when behind the wheel of any vehicle they can get their mits on, then you should be entertained.

Harry Watson - The Mile Eater
The Kennett Brothers
Staying in New Zealand for a moment, this publication is about the first New Zealander to enter the TdF back in 1928. An excellent read, backed up with wonderous b&w photographs of the era, following his domination in NZ and appearances in Oz, plus his trials of riding the toughest race on the planet, when it was really tough! This is an NZ publication so doubt this is available here, so if anyone would like a read, please PM me.

French Revolutions
Tim Moore
Has been mentioned before on this thread, and i also recommend. Very funny once he gets going on the ride. Has many laugh out loud moments which were embarassing for me on 140 to Dudley.

The Masked Rider - Cycling in West Africa
Neil Peart
The lyricist and drummer of canadian band Rush, cycles through Cameroon as part of an adventure tour group. An enjoyable travel memoir in which he attempts reveal the face behind the mask of Africa.

Sex, Lies and Handlebar Tape
Paul Howard
Biography of the 'Master' cyclist Jacques Anquetil. Struggling through this at the moment, will report back once finished....

Not a book, but a publication i think worth mentioning is The Ride. Packed full of short offerings, along with artwork and photographs, of peoples experiences of cycling. Contributions by all kinds of people, from joe public, to Ralf Hutter (Kraftwerk), via Victoria Penndleton and Greg Lemond.

Lisa
Posts: 18
Joined: 19 Nov 2006 16:51
Real Name:
Location: Drayton, Worcestershire

Post by Lisa » 26 Aug 2008 20:47

I've just read some of the previous posts. I don't think George is taking this reading business as seriously as he should! :wink:
Why?

User avatar
CakeStop
Posts: 1211
Joined: 17 Nov 2006 21:57
Real Name: Steve Smith
Location: Birmingham

A Century of Cycling by William Fotheringham

Post by CakeStop » 10 Oct 2008 18:57

A Century of Cycling by William Fotheringham

More a text book than a good read but it does provide a very readable summary of the subject (well at least the male side of the sport, a point made by a previous reader of the copy I borrowed). There's a section for each of the 3 big stage tours and all of the one day classics. There's a summary of each of the most well known racers through history, often giving an insight into their personality, listing their main successes. Plenty of tales of skulduggery and derring-do. Appendix listing winners of all of the above races up to 2002.

Available from Birmingham Libraries.

User avatar
CakeStop
Posts: 1211
Joined: 17 Nov 2006 21:57
Real Name: Steve Smith
Location: Birmingham

Post by CakeStop » 25 Oct 2008 09:58

Mattoid wrote: In Search of Robert Millar
Richard Moore
This was read in a couple of sittings, again an essential read about another of the UK's most successful cyclist, if not THE most successful. He was my cycling hero, so was pleased to find this a great read - recommended!!
I'll second that - just finished it, possibly the most enjoyable cycling biog' I've read. A strange but fascinating character.

User avatar
CakeStop
Posts: 1211
Joined: 17 Nov 2006 21:57
Real Name: Steve Smith
Location: Birmingham

A Significant Other by Matt Rendell

Post by CakeStop » 24 Nov 2008 20:42

A Significant Other by Matt Rendell

Overall, not one of my favourites, but I did really enjoy the chapters written from the eyes of Victor Hugo Pena. These chapters are worth reading in their own right even if you skip the rest of the book.

Stats
Posts: 83
Joined: 04 Dec 2006 10:36
Real Name:
Location: Redditch UK

Post by Stats » 21 Jan 2009 15:51

Just finished Hero's Villians & Velodromes I found it an interesting & very informative read mainly charting Chris Hoy's career. But on reading the chapters regarding the BCF involvement in their almost non existant assistance in trying to help riders you can see why our riders were so far behind thankfully somebody woke up took the bull by the horns and finally did what needed to be done greatly assisted by of course the great british public purchasing lots of lottery tickets :lol: Lets hope they can do the same for the road cyclists.Next book to start Bradley Wiggins

User avatar
Neil Compton
Posts: 257
Joined: 19 Nov 2006 15:39
Real Name:
Location: Northfield

Post by Neil Compton » 17 Feb 2009 13:28

Has anyone read a book called 'ROUGH RIDE' by Paul Kimmage?

User avatar
John Sanderson
Posts: 114
Joined: 27 Nov 2006 21:35
Real Name:
Location: Colchester, Essex

Post by John Sanderson » 17 Feb 2009 16:05

Rough Ride? Yes - it was quite interesting but I believe Kimmage is 'notorious' amongst journo's / certain cyclists (Lance!) so am not sure if it would be everyones cup of tea.
It's all about the bike.

User avatar
Neil Compton
Posts: 257
Joined: 19 Nov 2006 15:39
Real Name:
Location: Northfield

Post by Neil Compton » 17 Feb 2009 16:38

Yer i've been watching the Tour of California on eurosport and he said something to Lance Armstrong that was despicable. I sent in an email to Dave Harmon and he gave me and the club a mention and read out part of my email. I asked who Paul Kimmage was and he mentioned his book. Not sure i want to read it though.

User avatar
PeteB
Posts: 2
Joined: 13 Mar 2009 14:30
Real Name:

Post by PeteB » 19 Mar 2009 10:16

The Rider - Tim Krabbe is fantastic
Heroes, Villans and Velodromes - Not really a fan of track but this is still a fascinating insight.
In search of Robert Millar- Another great insightful read.
Tomorow We Ride - Jean Bobet. A great book about 2 brother riding Paris-Roubaix. Its quite hard to find but is well worth reading.
"The problem with quotes on the internet is that you are never sure if the person actually said them" - Abraham Lincoln

Mattoid
Posts: 40
Joined: 10 Oct 2007 16:52
Real Name: Philip Griffiths

Post by Mattoid » 20 Mar 2009 12:40

PeteB wrote:Tomorow We Ride - Jean Bobet. A great book about 2 brother riding Paris-Roubaix. Its quite hard to find but is well worth reading.
i have had this in my amazon wishlist for a while, after reading Brian Palmers positive review over at http://www.thewashingmachinepost.net/ar ... html#bobet. typically, its now out of stock :x

As for Rough Ride, i am about to begin...

Lisa
Posts: 18
Joined: 19 Nov 2006 16:51
Real Name:
Location: Drayton, Worcestershire

Post by Lisa » 20 Mar 2009 21:01

Finally read Josie Dew's 'Slow Coast Home' recently. This is the book in which she rides around the coastline of England and Wales. It's a pleasant light read with some laugh-aloud moments.

Philip's now reading it and has pointed out that she devotes more than half the book to the south west peninsula and then seems to dash around the rest of the coast to complete the exercise. Although she writes entertainingly throughout you certainly get the impression that the novelty might have started to wane quite early on.

It'll be interesting to read one of her other books about trips abroad - see how it compares. Does anyone have any specific recommendations?
Why?

Mattoid
Posts: 40
Joined: 10 Oct 2007 16:52
Real Name: Philip Griffiths

Post by Mattoid » 02 Apr 2009 12:58

Lisa, you can borrow my copy of...
Mattoid wrote:Long Cloud Ride
Josie Dew
Another one in the series of books by Josie recording her worldly travels by velo. This time around New Zealand. For me, this was a good read as it brought back many memories of travelling around this wonderful country nearly 10 years ago now. If you can get past the repeated fact that most kiwis are nutters when behind the wheel of any vehicle they can get their mits on, then you should be entertained.

Mattoid
Posts: 40
Joined: 10 Oct 2007 16:52
Real Name: Philip Griffiths

Post by Mattoid » 02 Apr 2009 13:20

John Sanderson wrote:Rough Ride? not sure if it would be everyones cup of tea.
Indeed. An uncomfortable read at times, as PK's dreams of becoming a pro were certainly broken as he discovered what was potentially required to compete with the best. He felt cheated, not by the pro peleton, but by the system, and as we all would like to expose the fraudsters, he certainly went at it all guns blazing. Yes, his recent choice of words regarding LA, were certainly beyond belief, but i would not like to damn the man for who's book could certainly have been the catalyst for change (though ultimately, has there been change?). Bitter is a word, and if you read this, you will no doubt find many other words to describe him and his book. Approach with caution!

User avatar
Kermit
Posts: 154
Joined: 20 Nov 2006 18:00
Real Name:
Location: Hollywood, Worcestershire

Post by Kermit » 04 Apr 2009 22:50

The Ride is a magazine. But don't be put off. It's not like any other cycling magazine you ever read. The articles are written by people passionate about the sport, from all over the world from the lowly club member to world champions. What they have in common is that they bring an insight into elements that you just don't see anywhere else and they are accompanied by some fantastic photographs and ilustrations. The second edition has just been published and can be ordered direct: http://www.theridejournal.com/ All I need to do now is see if I can get hold of a copy of the first edition.

A review can also be seen on the Washing Machine Post: http://www.thewashingmachinepost.net/ which, is also well worth a visit. It is updated most days and you can also see a rather nice retro Italian jersey by Columba which of course just happens to be Beacon colours.

Lisa
Posts: 18
Joined: 19 Nov 2006 16:51
Real Name:
Location: Drayton, Worcestershire

Post by Lisa » 05 Apr 2009 16:58

Mattoid wrote:Lisa, you can borrow my copy of...
Mattoid wrote:Long Cloud Ride
Josie Dew
Another one in the series of books by Josie recording her worldly travels by velo. This time around New Zealand. For me, this was a good read as it brought back many memories of travelling around this wonderful country nearly 10 years ago now. If you can get past the repeated fact that most kiwis are nutters when behind the wheel of any vehicle they can get their mits on, then you should be entertained.
Damn - bought this very book just days ago when I could have read it for free! Haven't started it yet. Reading another cycling book at present - a very unusual one that I shall post a few comments on when I'm done...
Why?

Mattoid
Posts: 40
Joined: 10 Oct 2007 16:52
Real Name: Philip Griffiths

Post by Mattoid » 05 Apr 2009 21:16

Kermit wrote:The Ride is a magazine. But don't be put off. It's not like any other cycling magazine you ever read. The articles are written by people passionate about the sport, from all over the world from the lowly club member to world champions. What they have in common is that they bring an insight into elements that you just don't see anywhere else and they are accompanied by some fantastic photographs and ilustrations. The second edition has just been published and can be ordered direct: http://www.theridejournal.com/ All I need to do now is see if I can get hold of a copy of the first edition.
I am presently working through the 2nd edition, which is of the same high quality as the first, which you are very welcome to borrow Paul.
Kermit wrote:A review can also be seen on the Washing Machine Post: http://www.thewashingmachinepost.net/ which, is also well worth a visit. It is updated most days and you can also see a rather nice retro Italian jersey by Columba which of course just happens to be Beacon colours.
I have a look at Brian Palmers excellent blog daily. I have swore to myself to join him on his Ride of the Falling Rain one year, if only to visit all eight distilleries! :D

User avatar
Kermit
Posts: 154
Joined: 20 Nov 2006 18:00
Real Name:
Location: Hollywood, Worcestershire

Post by Kermit » 06 Apr 2009 13:42

I'll take you up on your kind offer Phil as I don't think there will be any more available unless they do another reprint. Cheers

The Falling Rain Ride certainly does look an attractive prospect, great jersey too.

User avatar
Philip Whiteman
Posts: 1712
Joined: 19 Nov 2006 16:17
Real Name:
Location: Drayton, Worcestershire

Post by Philip Whiteman » 10 Apr 2009 19:24

Kermit wrote:The Ride is a magazine. But don't be put off. It's not like any other cycling magazine you ever read. The articles are written by people passionate about the sport, from all over the world from the lowly club member to world champions. What they have in common is that they bring an insight into elements that you just don't see anywhere else and they are accompanied by some fantastic photographs and ilustrations. The second edition has just been published and can be ordered direct: http://www.theridejournal.com/ All I need to do now is see if I can get hold of a copy of the first edition.

A review can also be seen on the Washing Machine Post: http://www.thewashingmachinepost.net/ which, is also well worth a visit. It is updated most days and you can also see a rather nice retro Italian jersey by Columba which of course just happens to be Beacon colours.
Paul, this was a great recommendation and well worth the purchase. As you suggest, it is a journal. It contains a series of excellently written mini-essays by cyclists from all different parts of the sport, including top athletes, ordinary audaxers, shop owners, engineers and BMX riders. Perhaps the most amusing essay covered an Italian race where participants were only allowed to ride pre-1987 bikes with accompanying attire.

In places the prose are shadow written, for example, with Hoy and Beaumont articles but in whole the literary standard is high. The editing team behind this journal are clearly artistic and highly professional in the approach. They obviously had designs on delivering something different and they succeeded.

The Ride is nothing like a normal magazine, in fact it is incomparable. Even the few adverts are exemplars of excellent design and photography. Free of the usual junky component comparisons, useless articles giving advice or news from the latest uninteresting sporting event, The Ride is very much different. This journal makes Cycling Weekly et al appear as a jokes in the cycling media.

I hope that the editing team look towards the production of more editions.

Lisa
Posts: 18
Joined: 19 Nov 2006 16:51
Real Name:
Location: Drayton, Worcestershire

Post by Lisa » 15 Apr 2009 20:08

I recently finished reading a very curious book called 'Travels with Rosinante (?)' by Bernard something-or-other. I would be more precise, but I instantly lent it to Steve to read so I can't copy down the rather magnificent French surname. This chap rode around the world in the early to mid 1980s (there's a fantastic photo of him on the front cover looking every bit from this era). It's translated from the French and he's a pretty entertaining chappy with some very frank things to say about the ladies. He also does some unspeakable things to his bike to keep it going through the wilds for so long. Surprisingly short as a book considering how far he rode and how long he was riding for, but that just means it's a higher concentration of interesting anecdotes. Goodness knows if you can still buy this book - I found it for sale in a second hand books collection.
Why?

User avatar
CakeStop
Posts: 1211
Joined: 17 Nov 2006 21:57
Real Name: Steve Smith
Location: Birmingham

Post by CakeStop » 16 Apr 2009 09:22

Lisa wrote:I recently finished reading a very curious book called 'Travels with Rosinante (?)' by Bernard something-or-other. I would be more precise, but I instantly lent it to Steve to read so I can't copy down the rather magnificent French surname.
It's Bernard Magnouloux.

I'm a few chapters in and enjoying it. It's refreshing because you get the feeling that he did the ride without planning to write the book, in fact without much planning at all. He seems to have just made it up as he went along, for example making a sketch copy of a map belonging to someone he met along the way in order to find his way through Sudan.
Eat cake before you're hungry

User avatar
George
Posts: 1644
Joined: 18 Nov 2006 10:21
Real Name: George Barker
Location: Worcestershire

Post by George » 16 Apr 2009 19:50

CakeStop wrote:He seems to have just made it up as he went along, for example making a sketch copy of a map belonging to someone he met along the way in order to find his way through Sudan.
Sounds like one of my club runs. OK, Dave: it sounds like one of my intro rides.

Post Reply

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests