Shabby frames

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George
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Shabby frames

Post by George » 10 Nov 2008 22:19

Somewhat belatedly (having hardly done a tap in the last few weeks), I've been working on my winter bike, making sure it's nice and clean before I get it dirty.

And there's no getting away from the fact that the frame is very shabby: paintwork chipped, scuffed and thoroughly grimy in a way that just won't come clean. So I started wondering about getting it resprayed some time. But it's only a cheap frame, and a respray would cost nearly as much as I paid for the blessed thing in the first place.

It seems ridiculous to bin a perfectly good frame just because it's looking shabby. It also seems ridiculous to spend £120 getting an old frame resprayed, when I could buy a brand new one for £175. But if I don't do one of these ridiculous things, I've got to ride it as it is until it fails ... which might be years and years.

Stats
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Post by Stats » 10 Nov 2008 22:35

I made the mistake of throwing my old Autostrada frame in the skip because it was so expensive to A) respray B) have new rear dropouts as the screws had snapped and C) to modernize it to take todays parts I have an old Nigel Dean frame in a similar state that I use on the I-Magic I have just had a better more modern frame built for Fortius/I-Magic use so I can get a bike back on the road permanently :lol: Oh the joys of cycling whatever shall I do next get rid of the Nigel Dean and use my Fixed for the I-Magic :roll:

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GrahamGamblin
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Post by GrahamGamblin » 11 Nov 2008 13:12

George - would it be possible to spray it yourself? It would mean stripping everything off the frame, I suppose, but would save the pennies. Read a post on another forum by a guy who did this - took everything off the frame, rubbed it down with wire wool, hung it on the washing line (really) and sprayed and lacquered it with Halfords products. Cost very little, took a few days though for a couple of coats and drying time.
Graham

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chalkie
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Post by chalkie » 11 Nov 2008 16:19

george - nitromorse an' go...

http://picasaweb.google.com/blancgraffi ... 5929524882

this is Dan Wilds titanium bike which he donated to beacon (me). 8)
and on the 7th day God created CLEATS..!

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George
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Post by George » 11 Nov 2008 20:16

Thanks for the suggestions, both.

In the past, when I had more time and more motivation than I have these days, I have both brush-painted and spayed frames by hand. In terms of out-of-pocket expense, it does save money. And it provides a sort of satisfaction similar to growing your own spuds or making your own beer. However, it's a painstaking business that requires a lot of time. So, if you put a price on your own time, it works out a very expensive way of doing things. There are also practical issues, such as dust-free, moisture-free, child-free, dog-free space.

I admire anyone who does it, but I see it more of a hobby in its own right than a practical way of maintaining one's winter bike. Personally, when I can escape work and family commitments for a few hours, I'd rather spend them riding my bike than painting it.

Charles: the bikes in your gallery look great. However, much as I enjoy admiring bikes like that and reminiscing about times past, I've very glad that I no longer have to ride or maintain anything of the kind on a day-to-day basis.

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Post by Kermit » 11 Nov 2008 22:30

Powder coating is the economical answer. Bourne Powder Coating in Birmingham used to offer some great finishes including metallics that were difficult to tell from a stoved finish, and just as durable. The last frame I had done cost about £25 and that includes blast cleaning so all you have to do is remove all the cycle parts. :wink:

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Post by Rod Goodfellow » 12 Nov 2008 02:07

George,how did you spay your frame? Did you just remove all the balls? Did it make it any easier to control?

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George
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Post by George » 12 Nov 2008 07:37

Kermit wrote:Powder coating is the economical answer. Bourne Powder Coating in Birmingham used to offer some great finishes including metallics that were difficult to tell from a stoved finish, and just as durable. The last frame I had done cost about £25 and that includes blast cleaning so all you have to do is remove all the cycle parts. :wink:
Paul, I did Google on powder coating, but the first couple of firms I looked at were nearly as expensive as enamellers, so I discounted the idea. However, your tip suggests to me that I gave up my search too soon. I'll try and track these Bourne people down. Thanks!
Last edited by George on 12 Nov 2008 07:52, edited 1 time in total.

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George
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Post by George » 12 Nov 2008 07:50

Rod Goodfellow wrote:George,how did you spay your frame? Did you just remove all the balls? Did it make it any easier to control?
Rod, the mount that I spayed was always very docile and responsive, which is why I was loath to send her to the knackers yard when her coat lost its lustre. So, as in all the other spayings I've heard of, balls didn't come into it.

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Re: Shabby frames

Post by Almac » 12 Nov 2008 10:00

George wrote:Somewhat belatedly (having hardly done a tap in the last few weeks), I've been working on my winter bike, making sure it's nice and clean before I get it dirty.

And there's no getting away from the fact that the frame is very shabby: paintwork chipped, scuffed and thoroughly grimy in a way that just won't come clean. So I started wondering about getting it resprayed some time. But it's only a cheap frame, and a respray would cost nearly as much as I paid for the blessed thing in the first place.

It seems ridiculous to bin a perfectly good frame just because it's looking shabby. It also seems ridiculous to spend £120 getting an old frame resprayed, when I could buy a brand new one for £175. But if I don't do one of these ridiculous things, I've got to ride it as it is until it fails ... which might be years and years.
George bring it in we can get it done for about £40
If your close enough to read this - Do a Turn!

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George
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Post by George » 12 Nov 2008 12:07

That's a very competitive offer, Alister -- I'll be in touch.

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George
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Post by George » 03 Dec 2008 18:03

Well my winter/laden tourer is back on the road and, with a bit of help from Alister, looking a good deal less shabby than when I started this thread. It's no longer a dull blue, but a rather fetching green. My dry-weather training frame has also been re-done and is now a slightly unusual colour that can't quite make up its mind whether it wants to be brick red or orange. With sparkly bits. Which isn't quite what I was expecting, but is sure to be the envy of every ten-year-old for miles.

Image

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Post by Adrian » 03 Dec 2008 19:54

Very smart George! I must clean my winter bike it looks a right mess comparied to your new ride.

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Post by Ed Moss » 03 Dec 2008 21:28

Fence could do with mending, if I bring my dog round she will be straight through that hole :shock:

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George
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Post by George » 03 Dec 2008 22:35

Ed Moss wrote:Fence could do with mending, if I bring my dog round she will be straight through that hole :shock:
Only if she can land like a cat. It's an eight-foot drop.

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Post by David Cole » 04 Dec 2008 08:09

Very nice George
Looks as if you're planning some serious climbing

Dave
David Cole

Beacon Roads Cycling Club

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Post by Ringo » 04 Dec 2008 08:46

think you need to look at your position George. Your sat so far forward you've bent your saddle :lol:

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