Heavy refurb or replacement?

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Philip Whiteman
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Heavy refurb or replacement?

Post by Philip Whiteman » 26 Mar 2012 18:32

Am I the only one who gets to the end of their tether or is the following a rational course of action.


I am seriously considering the following with my Orbea.

1. Replace the entire bike
2. Complete renewal of group-set and wheels.

Reliability of the transmission has become increasingly less reliable within recent years. Errant gears that never hold an adjustment, the free-hub is erratic and I continue to throw good money after bad treplaing components on a sporadic basis. Having lost my temper with the reached machine on various occasions I have also taken it to using three different shops - each having resolved the problem then only to suffer something else fail at a later date. I am wondering if the machine is simply wearing out.

I don't want to pander to the natural instinct of buying a new bike for the sake of buying a new bike, but is a heavy renewal of everything non-frame an economic folly?

Rod Goodfellow
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Post by Rod Goodfellow » 26 Mar 2012 19:21

Sounds like a Shimano groupset.Replace with Campagnolo every 20 or so years.

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CakeStop
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Post by CakeStop » 26 Mar 2012 21:20

Surely it depends on how much the frame is worth to you.
Eat cake before you're hungry

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AlanW
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Post by AlanW » 26 Mar 2012 22:28

I blame a lack of periodic routine maintenance........ :roll:

But joking aside, look at the faults and break it down from there. Lets be honest, there are not that many components that can give you grief and once they are replaced should last for years, bottom bracket and the front and rear mechs for example.

Cables, chains, chain rings and cassettes are throw away items really and should not be included.

However, if you are thinking about buying a whole new group set, with some of the deals on complete bikes at the moment, you would be daft to even consider it IMHO.
"You only need two tools: WD40 and duct tape. If it doesn't move and it should, use WD40. If it moves and it shouldn't, use duct tape"

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Philip Whiteman
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Post by Philip Whiteman » 29 Mar 2012 07:50

PROBLEM SOLVED & PROBLEM CREATED - IT IS REPLACEMENT!

They discovered a fracture in the chain stay.

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Neil Compton
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Post by Neil Compton » 29 Mar 2012 09:24

Is that a carbon fibre frame? How long have you had it?

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Philip Whiteman
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Post by Philip Whiteman » 29 Mar 2012 12:58

Neil Compton wrote:Is that a carbon fibre frame? How long have you had it?
It is a four year old carbon frame. To be honest, having heard numerous stories over the years of carbon frames failing, I have suffered a nagging feeling about riding such bikes. That was the principle reason why my last purchase should be for a titanium frame.

I suffered one accident on this bike three years when I feel on the same side as the broken chain stay. At the time there no visible damage but it may have been hidden. It is possible that damaged fibres progressively deteroriated resulting in the eventual fracture. Otherwise it must be an age or manufacturing fault.

Sufficient to say that I will never feel fully secure riding a carbon.

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