Saddlepost bag for London to Paris

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jkwilson84
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Saddlepost bag for London to Paris

Post by jkwilson84 » 08 Jan 2017 15:06

Hi all, myself and three others are cycling to Paris in the Summer over three days, all of us are against panniers and fancy trying to cycle with simply a saddle post bag and post our clothes to a hotel in Paris. (Dont care about sitting in a french pub in bib tights in the evening! ha)
Can anyone recommend a saddle post bag that would be advised for this sort of trip?
Also if anyone has any tips on cycling London to Paris especially on what to take with us that would also be appreciated!

James

Dave Cox
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Post by Dave Cox » 08 Jan 2017 17:30

Hi I use a Bag Man support and a traditional Carradice saddle bag. But these days "bike packing" has become popular and there a some large bags available that dont need the support. Isla Rowntree uses one to go to cyclo cross races overnight but i am not sure of the make. I think Ortlieb do one.

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StuartWhite
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Post by StuartWhite » 09 Jan 2017 09:56

Hi James,

I did a few long haul rides without panniers last year and used a 'seat pack' which is part of the bike packing (as mentioned by Dave) luggage now used as alternatives to panniers.
I used this one if I was riding through the night:-
http://www.wiggle.co.uk/altura-vortex-seatpack/
So I could carry a change of lycra etc, but also it was one of the cheaper options. The swanky ones are made by Apidura (UK company) lovely but they are a fit bit more expensive. Again as mentioned Ortleib also do an option but also a bit more expensive.
Have a look for handlebar pack and/or frame bag as an addition or even alternative. The frame pack gives you a bit more balance to the bike and allows for a little 'easy access' saddle bag instead of the big boy.

3 of us did Paris to London in a day last year which was quite an experience.
We got the Eurostar form London to Paris with the bikes all packed in boxes (they only allow 2 bikes per train so we had to beat the system and treat it as luggage) wearing old clothes. When we arrived in Paris, we built the bikes on the platform, got changed into our kit and threw the old clobber in the bin.
Cycled all day to the Ferry and then through the night back to London. We only took gilets and arm warmers with minimal food supplies (plan your route around civilisation for food stops - service stations are the most reliable) and split our tools out between the 3 of us to keep weight down. Couple of multi tools, number of inner tubes, 1 pump, CO2 inflator etc.
I didn't use the bike pack for that trip, so if you are, aim to rinse your gear on the night and you'd be able to fit some light clothing and some flip flops in there fairly comfortably - light running style T-shirt, lightweight walking trousers both pack down small.
If there's a bit of a chill on the evenings, re-use your gilet and arm warmers. It'll make a real difference to get out of your sweaty clobber of an evening and put on some 'civies'.

One thing that makes every morning a joy to start - tooth brush - it'll brighten your day I tell thee.
Cheers,

Stu

It never gets easier, you just go faster.
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jkwilson84
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Post by jkwilson84 » 09 Jan 2017 20:09

Dave Cox wrote:Hi I use a Bag Man support and a traditional Carradice saddle bag. But these days "bike packing" has become popular and there a some large bags available that dont need the support. Isla Rowntree uses one to go to cyclo cross races overnight but i am not sure of the make. I think Ortlieb do one.
Thanks Dave!

jkwilson84
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Joined: 19 Aug 2015 22:16
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Post by jkwilson84 » 09 Jan 2017 20:15

StuartWhite wrote:Hi James,

I did a few long haul rides without panniers last year and used a 'seat pack' which is part of the bike packing (as mentioned by Dave) luggage now used as alternatives to panniers.
I used this one if I was riding through the night:-
http://www.wiggle.co.uk/altura-vortex-seatpack/
So I could carry a change of lycra etc, but also it was one of the cheaper options. The swanky ones are made by Apidura (UK company) lovely but they are a fit bit more expensive. Again as mentioned Ortleib also do an option but also a bit more expensive.
Have a look for handlebar pack and/or frame bag as an addition or even alternative. The frame pack gives you a bit more balance to the bike and allows for a little 'easy access' saddle bag instead of the big boy.

3 of us did Paris to London in a day last year which was quite an experience.
We got the Eurostar form London to Paris with the bikes all packed in boxes (they only allow 2 bikes per train so we had to beat the system and treat it as luggage) wearing old clothes. When we arrived in Paris, we built the bikes on the platform, got changed into our kit and threw the old clobber in the bin.
Cycled all day to the Ferry and then through the night back to London. We only took gilets and arm warmers with minimal food supplies (plan your route around civilisation for food stops - service stations are the most reliable) and split our tools out between the 3 of us to keep weight down. Couple of multi tools, number of inner tubes, 1 pump, CO2 inflator etc.
I didn't use the bike pack for that trip, so if you are, aim to rinse your gear on the night and you'd be able to fit some light clothing and some flip flops in there fairly comfortably - light running style T-shirt, lightweight walking trousers both pack down small.
If there's a bit of a chill on the evenings, re-use your gilet and arm warmers. It'll make a real difference to get out of your sweaty clobber of an evening and put on some 'civies'.

One thing that makes every morning a joy to start - tooth brush - it'll brighten your day I tell thee.
Thanks Stuart some really great advice! especially the toothbrush tip! Thanks

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